Thus, the childhood, in the maturity we lose

Thus, he makes a connection with the ‘imperial palace’
which is where we came from, and the memories that we have in there can only be
remembered in the childhood. As a part of our childhood, ‘imperial palace’ is related
to pure existence.  Wordsworth accepts
childhood as a blessed condition like Blake. He calls childhood as ‘mighty
prophet’. He believes, his childhood memories will always guide him in the
journey of innocence and he sees them as a medium that may lead him to his lost
instincts.            To conclude,
Blake’s several poems and Wordsworth’s The
Immortality Ode is examined in this essay. Blake’s The Lamb poem is used to give an answer to the origins of human
mind. The characteristics of the lamb in the poem show similarities with a
higher power. Their similar characteristics build a connection between two. Considering
the lamb as a child and the divine power as the God provides a better
understanding of the power of the child. To conclude from here, it is
understood that child can see and reflect the traces of God in life. Also, the
poem of Blake Infant Joy is used to
show how the child image is related to the capacity for creative imagination. This idea comes from Blake’s ‘natural child’ idea. He
believed that a child has a capacity for joy and play and these are core requirements
for the creative imagination. Besides, the Songs of Experience poems refer to how
child’s innocence and capacity for creative imagination is corrupted by
institutions. On the other hand, Wordsworth’s The Immortality Ode is examined. Wordsworth used the child image
for the same reasons like Blake. He advocated child’s superiority both morally
and imaginatively. However, the difference is Wordsworth brings child’s
interiority to the forefront and he did not put the child’s voice first-hand
unlike Blake did. Wordsworth saw a tendency to materialization in this world which
blinds our ‘visionary gleam’ that comes from the ‘imperial palace’ when we
born. While we can still remember where we come from in the childhood, in the maturity
we lose this vision and as a consequence this, we lose our creative
imagination.      

 Works CitedBenziman, G. “Two
Patterns of Child Neglect: Blake and Wordsworth.” Partial Answers:
Journal of Literature and the History of Ideas, vol. 5 no. 2, 2007, pp.
167-197.          Blake,
William. “Infant Joy.” The Norton Anthology
English Literature, edited by Stephen Greenblatt, 9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 123.Blake,
William. “The Chimney Sweeper.” The Norton
Anthology English Literature, edited by Stephen Greenblatt,  9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 128.Blake,
William. “The Lamb.” The Norton Anthology
English Literature, edited by Stephen Greenblatt,  9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 120.Lincoln, Kenneth R. “Wordsworth’s Mortality Ode.” The Journal of
English and Germanic Philology, vol. 71, no. 2, 1972,
pp. 211–225.Makdisi,
Saree. William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s.
Chicago: Universtiy of Chicago Press, 2003. Print.

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Wordsworth,
William. “Ode: Intimation of Immortality fro Recallections of Early Childhood.”
The Norton Anthology English Literature,
edited by Stephen Greenblatt,  9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 337-341.

Thus, he makes a connection with the ‘imperial palace’
which is where we came from, and the memories that we have in there can only be
remembered in the childhood. As a part of our childhood, ‘imperial palace’ is related
to pure existence.  Wordsworth accepts
childhood as a blessed condition like Blake. He calls childhood as ‘mighty
prophet’. He believes, his childhood memories will always guide him in the
journey of innocence and he sees them as a medium that may lead him to his lost
instincts.            To conclude,
Blake’s several poems and Wordsworth’s The
Immortality Ode is examined in this essay. Blake’s The Lamb poem is used to give an answer to the origins of human
mind. The characteristics of the lamb in the poem show similarities with a
higher power. Their similar characteristics build a connection between two. Considering
the lamb as a child and the divine power as the God provides a better
understanding of the power of the child. To conclude from here, it is
understood that child can see and reflect the traces of God in life. Also, the
poem of Blake Infant Joy is used to
show how the child image is related to the capacity for creative imagination. This idea comes from Blake’s ‘natural child’ idea. He
believed that a child has a capacity for joy and play and these are core requirements
for the creative imagination. Besides, the Songs of Experience poems refer to how
child’s innocence and capacity for creative imagination is corrupted by
institutions. On the other hand, Wordsworth’s The Immortality Ode is examined. Wordsworth used the child image
for the same reasons like Blake. He advocated child’s superiority both morally
and imaginatively. However, the difference is Wordsworth brings child’s
interiority to the forefront and he did not put the child’s voice first-hand
unlike Blake did. Wordsworth saw a tendency to materialization in this world which
blinds our ‘visionary gleam’ that comes from the ‘imperial palace’ when we
born. While we can still remember where we come from in the childhood, in the maturity
we lose this vision and as a consequence this, we lose our creative
imagination.      

 Works CitedBenziman, G. “Two
Patterns of Child Neglect: Blake and Wordsworth.” Partial Answers:
Journal of Literature and the History of Ideas, vol. 5 no. 2, 2007, pp.
167-197.          Blake,
William. “Infant Joy.” The Norton Anthology
English Literature, edited by Stephen Greenblatt, 9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 123.Blake,
William. “The Chimney Sweeper.” The Norton
Anthology English Literature, edited by Stephen Greenblatt,  9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 128.Blake,
William. “The Lamb.” The Norton Anthology
English Literature, edited by Stephen Greenblatt,  9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 120.Lincoln, Kenneth R. “Wordsworth’s Mortality Ode.” The Journal of
English and Germanic Philology, vol. 71, no. 2, 1972,
pp. 211–225.Makdisi,
Saree. William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s.
Chicago: Universtiy of Chicago Press, 2003. Print.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Wordsworth,
William. “Ode: Intimation of Immortality fro Recallections of Early Childhood.”
The Norton Anthology English Literature,
edited by Stephen Greenblatt,  9th
ed,
W. W. Norton & Company, 2012, pp. 337-341.

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