The how several impacts have altered the

The institution of the
family within China is one that has undergone a wealth of change throughout
time, however especially during the past 100 years. In this essay I will be
examining how several impacts have altered the dynamics of the Chinese family,
beginning with the founding of the PRC in 1949 and concluding with the
modern-day contemporary Chinese family.

To give some brief context
on the views of the Chinese Communist Party towards the family in pre-PRC
China, it’s important to remember that in the period between the 1930’s and
1940’s when they were coming to power that Mao and his party were trying to
condemn the notion of the traditional and feudal family which China had lived
under for countless years (Wolf, 1984).  This
condemning was done as part of a huge reform of the concept of the Chinese
family which began to give equal rights to men and women within marriages and
family life (Wong, 1982). However, as time passed, and the China became the PRC
the complicated relationship between the CCP and the Chinese family as an
institution becomes clearer and clearer.

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                                                                               It
was the failure of Mao’s destruction of the family as a patriarchal institute that
led the CCP to begin to do the opposite – to use the law, another institution
which had also been condemned (Wong, 1982) to actually protect, maintain and
modernise the family. It’s worth mentioning that examining the family through
the scope of marriage is a conclusive method to analyse changes within the
family as an institution as marriage lays the foundations off which a family
can be built, and it is also one of the conventions that has seen the most
reform within the period we’re examining. The CCP’s protection of the family began
with the Marriage Law of 1950 which put forward a set of radical changes to how
marriages and divorces functioned in China, making marriage a free consensual contract
between individuals (Freedman, 1962) and assuring that marriages would more of
an equal affair to women so as to “abolish the supremacy of man over woman” (Wolf,
1984). The Marriage Law meant that women and men have almost completely equal
rights in matters of property, residence, choice of work and care of children
(Freedman,1962) which completely altered the dynamics of marriages and families
throughout all of China. Also, 3 of its 8 chapters worked towards making
divorce a more equal system during the early PRC, allowing for women to initiate
divorce and bringing in mediation as a method of judging the validity of divorce
cases (Wong, 1982). However, the Marriage Law was received differently
throughout China – the urban areas tended to be more liberal and accepting of
these changes whilst the rural areas did their best to maintain their
traditional patriarchal beliefs concerning marriage and the family (Wolf,
1984). The law was a huge step towards moving away from the patriarchal and
feudal type of marriage that China had been accustomed to for so many years.

The institution of the
family within China is one that has undergone a wealth of change throughout
time, however especially during the past 100 years. In this essay I will be
examining how several impacts have altered the dynamics of the Chinese family,
beginning with the founding of the PRC in 1949 and concluding with the
modern-day contemporary Chinese family.

To give some brief context
on the views of the Chinese Communist Party towards the family in pre-PRC
China, it’s important to remember that in the period between the 1930’s and
1940’s when they were coming to power that Mao and his party were trying to
condemn the notion of the traditional and feudal family which China had lived
under for countless years (Wolf, 1984).  This
condemning was done as part of a huge reform of the concept of the Chinese
family which began to give equal rights to men and women within marriages and
family life (Wong, 1982). However, as time passed, and the China became the PRC
the complicated relationship between the CCP and the Chinese family as an
institution becomes clearer and clearer.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

                                                                               It
was the failure of Mao’s destruction of the family as a patriarchal institute that
led the CCP to begin to do the opposite – to use the law, another institution
which had also been condemned (Wong, 1982) to actually protect, maintain and
modernise the family. It’s worth mentioning that examining the family through
the scope of marriage is a conclusive method to analyse changes within the
family as an institution as marriage lays the foundations off which a family
can be built, and it is also one of the conventions that has seen the most
reform within the period we’re examining. The CCP’s protection of the family began
with the Marriage Law of 1950 which put forward a set of radical changes to how
marriages and divorces functioned in China, making marriage a free consensual contract
between individuals (Freedman, 1962) and assuring that marriages would more of
an equal affair to women so as to “abolish the supremacy of man over woman” (Wolf,
1984). The Marriage Law meant that women and men have almost completely equal
rights in matters of property, residence, choice of work and care of children
(Freedman,1962) which completely altered the dynamics of marriages and families
throughout all of China. Also, 3 of its 8 chapters worked towards making
divorce a more equal system during the early PRC, allowing for women to initiate
divorce and bringing in mediation as a method of judging the validity of divorce
cases (Wong, 1982). However, the Marriage Law was received differently
throughout China – the urban areas tended to be more liberal and accepting of
these changes whilst the rural areas did their best to maintain their
traditional patriarchal beliefs concerning marriage and the family (Wolf,
1984). The law was a huge step towards moving away from the patriarchal and
feudal type of marriage that China had been accustomed to for so many years.

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