The He had already achieved. Fitzgerald presents

The sought after thought of climbing the social and monetary
ladders of the American system. There are many different depictions of the American dream and
how to achieve it, because not everyone’s dreams are the same. Some dream of becoming
famous celebrities with the public staring in awe of their riches and benefits, while others dream
of raising a family in the rural countryside tending to their crops and cattle. Many, however,
don’t see anything true or valuable coming out of the frivolous chasing of The American Dream.
F. Scott Fitzgerald is one of those people, and he shows his beliefs throughout his novel, The
Great Gatsby. As we are drawn into the story of the flashy cars, giant mansions, and all of the
money in the world, Fitzgerald shows us just how shallow the chasing of The American Dream
really can be.
In the beginning of the novel, we see just how shallow you can be even when you have it
all. When we are first introduced to Jay Gatsby, he is shown as the kind of man everyone wants
to be. He has money, he has people coming and going from his parties at his mansions, and what
seems to be an endless supply of money. However, when looking closer, it’s shown how empty
Gatsby still is. The first time he is seen in the novel is standing on the end of his dock, reaching
out towards the green light:
Poellinger 2
“…he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and far as I was from
him I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward–and distinguished
nothing except a single green light, minute and far away…”(1.152)
This passage is showing that even though Gatsby seemingly had it all, there was still
more that he wanted, that which he couldn’t have: Daisy. In most people’s eyes Gatsby would
seem to have it all, but to Gatsby he is far from that goal. This is what Fitzgerald is trying to
prove by the fact that the American Dream is frivolous and pointless. People are always going to
be spreading their arms outward, reaching for what they don’t yet have or are not able to obtain.
However, Fitzgerald doesn’t make it easy for us to realize this.
The fact that Gatsby is still searching for his American dream is partially overshadowed
by the other achievements that He had already achieved. Fitzgerald presents Gatsby as the
perfect example of what the American Dream is to those who believe in the notion. Gatsby grew
up on the plains in the Dust Bowl,born to the name Jimmy Gatz, where he and his family
struggled to survive day in and day out. Gatsby is given the opportunity to run away and start a
new life, so he takes that chance and is rewarded by meeting Dan Cody. Cody is the mentor in
Gatsby’s life who shows him the ropes of being high class and how to make it in the world. A
series of miniscule decisions and seemingly accidental events that lead Gatsby in his rise to
riches and fame. Fitzgerald shows us just how good the American Dream can be; the wealth you
can acquire, the people you can meet, and the places you can go. Yet as the story goes on, we see
just how shallow Gatsby is until he achieves his goal of winning back Daisy from Tom. Even
Poellinger 3
when Gatsby finally wins Daisy over, we see that even the greatest things we can hope to
achieve are fleeting, and those that you can hope to love the most in this world can let you down.
After what seemed like an eternity for Gatsby, he seemingly achieved his goal: he got
Daisy.
“He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her
perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God…Then he kissed her.
At his lips’ touch she blossomed for him like a flower and the incarnation was complete.” (6.134)
Gatsby had finally won back the girl of his dreams and had completed his American
Dream. All was well and happy, except for one thing: Daisy was still married to Tom. Gatsby
thought that he could convince her to leave Tom and live with him for the rest of his days, he had
it all planned out and was ready to start a new with Daisy, but things don’t always go as we
planned. Daisy wouldn’t leave Tom, even after Gatsby and Daisy confronted Tom the day that
the two of them had planned to start their new life together. In the heat of the arguing and
yelling, Daisy rushes out and leaves in Gatsby’s car with Gatsby. In her emotional condition, she
can’t drive straight, and ends up hitting Myrtle, which ultimately leads to gatsby being shot by
her husband George.
Fitzgerald is showing that in the end of the novel the thing that gatsby wants most in this
world is what ultimately gets him killed. Daisy know’s it’s her fault too, that’s why she doesn’t
attend Gatsby’s funeral. She instead chooses to turn and run away with Tom, instead of facing
her sins. In fact, there is almost no one at Gatsby’s funeral. Once Gatsby can no longer offer is
Poellinger 4
dazzling parties or throw money at his friends to make them enjoy his presence, they act as if
they never associated with him, further proving how hallow and pointless the American Dream
really is.
In conclusion, it is quite evident throughout the entire novel The Great Gatsby that F.
Scott Fitzgerald does not believe in nor agree with the practices of chasing after The American
Dream. In Fitzgerald’s eye’s, the Dream is a never ending demand for something better than that
which you already have, and as humans that hunger will never be appeased. Gatsby tried to use
other things to distract him from his true dream, but none of it worked, and his true dream
ultimately lead to his death. In Fitzgerald’s eyes, its is better to appreciate what you already
have, rather than hunger for more, and never be satisfied.

The sought after thought of climbing the social and monetary
ladders of the American system. There are many different depictions of the American dream and
how to achieve it, because not everyone’s dreams are the same. Some dream of becoming
famous celebrities with the public staring in awe of their riches and benefits, while others dream
of raising a family in the rural countryside tending to their crops and cattle. Many, however,
don’t see anything true or valuable coming out of the frivolous chasing of The American Dream.
F. Scott Fitzgerald is one of those people, and he shows his beliefs throughout his novel, The
Great Gatsby. As we are drawn into the story of the flashy cars, giant mansions, and all of the
money in the world, Fitzgerald shows us just how shallow the chasing of The American Dream
really can be.
In the beginning of the novel, we see just how shallow you can be even when you have it
all. When we are first introduced to Jay Gatsby, he is shown as the kind of man everyone wants
to be. He has money, he has people coming and going from his parties at his mansions, and what
seems to be an endless supply of money. However, when looking closer, it’s shown how empty
Gatsby still is. The first time he is seen in the novel is standing on the end of his dock, reaching
out towards the green light:
Poellinger 2
“…he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and far as I was from
him I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward–and distinguished
nothing except a single green light, minute and far away…”(1.152)
This passage is showing that even though Gatsby seemingly had it all, there was still
more that he wanted, that which he couldn’t have: Daisy. In most people’s eyes Gatsby would
seem to have it all, but to Gatsby he is far from that goal. This is what Fitzgerald is trying to
prove by the fact that the American Dream is frivolous and pointless. People are always going to
be spreading their arms outward, reaching for what they don’t yet have or are not able to obtain.
However, Fitzgerald doesn’t make it easy for us to realize this.
The fact that Gatsby is still searching for his American dream is partially overshadowed
by the other achievements that He had already achieved. Fitzgerald presents Gatsby as the
perfect example of what the American Dream is to those who believe in the notion. Gatsby grew
up on the plains in the Dust Bowl,born to the name Jimmy Gatz, where he and his family
struggled to survive day in and day out. Gatsby is given the opportunity to run away and start a
new life, so he takes that chance and is rewarded by meeting Dan Cody. Cody is the mentor in
Gatsby’s life who shows him the ropes of being high class and how to make it in the world. A
series of miniscule decisions and seemingly accidental events that lead Gatsby in his rise to
riches and fame. Fitzgerald shows us just how good the American Dream can be; the wealth you
can acquire, the people you can meet, and the places you can go. Yet as the story goes on, we see
just how shallow Gatsby is until he achieves his goal of winning back Daisy from Tom. Even
Poellinger 3
when Gatsby finally wins Daisy over, we see that even the greatest things we can hope to
achieve are fleeting, and those that you can hope to love the most in this world can let you down.
After what seemed like an eternity for Gatsby, he seemingly achieved his goal: he got
Daisy.
“He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her
perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God…Then he kissed her.
At his lips’ touch she blossomed for him like a flower and the incarnation was complete.” (6.134)
Gatsby had finally won back the girl of his dreams and had completed his American
Dream. All was well and happy, except for one thing: Daisy was still married to Tom. Gatsby
thought that he could convince her to leave Tom and live with him for the rest of his days, he had
it all planned out and was ready to start a new with Daisy, but things don’t always go as we
planned. Daisy wouldn’t leave Tom, even after Gatsby and Daisy confronted Tom the day that
the two of them had planned to start their new life together. In the heat of the arguing and
yelling, Daisy rushes out and leaves in Gatsby’s car with Gatsby. In her emotional condition, she
can’t drive straight, and ends up hitting Myrtle, which ultimately leads to gatsby being shot by
her husband George.
Fitzgerald is showing that in the end of the novel the thing that gatsby wants most in this
world is what ultimately gets him killed. Daisy know’s it’s her fault too, that’s why she doesn’t
attend Gatsby’s funeral. She instead chooses to turn and run away with Tom, instead of facing
her sins. In fact, there is almost no one at Gatsby’s funeral. Once Gatsby can no longer offer is
Poellinger 4
dazzling parties or throw money at his friends to make them enjoy his presence, they act as if
they never associated with him, further proving how hallow and pointless the American Dream
really is.
In conclusion, it is quite evident throughout the entire novel The Great Gatsby that F.
Scott Fitzgerald does not believe in nor agree with the practices of chasing after The American
Dream. In Fitzgerald’s eye’s, the Dream is a never ending demand for something better than that
which you already have, and as humans that hunger will never be appeased. Gatsby tried to use
other things to distract him from his true dream, but none of it worked, and his true dream
ultimately lead to his death. In Fitzgerald’s eyes, its is better to appreciate what you already
have, rather than hunger for more, and never be satisfied.

x

Hi!
I'm Mary!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out