Suburban World War II, there was a growing trend

Suburban life and
farm life after World War II were different, but had some of the same
qualities. More people were relocating to the suburbs from city areas, where
living was confined to apartments, sometimes directly above where they worked.
After World War II, there was a growing trend known as suburbanization. In
inner cities, or urban areas, quality of life decreased. Many minorities were
left in urban areas and crime rates saw an increase.

There was a big push for suburban housing construction after World War II,
“with the Federal Housing Administration facilitating cheap loans to stimulate
the construction.” (Growth of Suburbs, n.d.) Marketing for housing in the
suburbs was to separate the working life from the home life, keeping families
as the priority in the suburbs. Post-war neighborhoods offered small-lot single
family homes. The majority of Americans fleeing from cities were white and had
the means and money to flee the city life. With small lots families could have
parties and have friends over with plenty of room. When families relocated from
the city, other suburban families were friendly and willing to assist. The temptation
to move out of the city was lower crime rates and comradery among neighbors.

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With the expansion of the suburbs in metropolitan areas, came an increased
crime rate in inner-cities. With the majority of white people leaving, this
left minorities with more crowded and polluted areas. This left cities with
poorer health conditions and fewer opportunities. Due to the industrialization
of cities, it made them less inhabitable and living conditions were
poorer.(Bauman, n.d.)

Along with the nice single lots and family barbecues and get-togethers came
increased education for suburban areas. Recreational functions increased with
boy scouts, girl scouts, baseball teams, and bicycle riding. Parents also
wanted to increase education for their children. Overall, parents were making a
better life for their children. Urban areas decided it was time to start
cleaning up. “Downtown business, civic, and political elites fashioned the
mechanism for downtown renaissance.” (Ever-changing) Multiple cities creating
housing and planning committees for city revitalization projects. Due to
joblessness and decline, “cities launched a host of anti-smoke pollution,
water, sewer, street, parking, and other urban improvement projects.”(Bauman,
n.d.)

While America was experiencing growth after World War II and urbanization was
taking place, decline in the standard of living and quality of life were
declining in inner-cities. To combat the decline, pollution, and health issues,
cities attempted to make the living situations better. Some of the renewal
process was seen as misguided, and did not work entirely. Suburban areas
increased with white population while minorities were thrust into inner city
life and lower standards of living. Americans were pulled toward suburban areas
for health reasons and less pollution, with the trade-off of more room to
spread. This was all part of American history and expansion during the
post-World War II era.

Suburban life and
farm life after World War II were different, but had some of the same
qualities. More people were relocating to the suburbs from city areas, where
living was confined to apartments, sometimes directly above where they worked.
After World War II, there was a growing trend known as suburbanization. In
inner cities, or urban areas, quality of life decreased. Many minorities were
left in urban areas and crime rates saw an increase.

There was a big push for suburban housing construction after World War II,
“with the Federal Housing Administration facilitating cheap loans to stimulate
the construction.” (Growth of Suburbs, n.d.) Marketing for housing in the
suburbs was to separate the working life from the home life, keeping families
as the priority in the suburbs. Post-war neighborhoods offered small-lot single
family homes. The majority of Americans fleeing from cities were white and had
the means and money to flee the city life. With small lots families could have
parties and have friends over with plenty of room. When families relocated from
the city, other suburban families were friendly and willing to assist. The temptation
to move out of the city was lower crime rates and comradery among neighbors.

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For You For Only $13.90/page!


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With the expansion of the suburbs in metropolitan areas, came an increased
crime rate in inner-cities. With the majority of white people leaving, this
left minorities with more crowded and polluted areas. This left cities with
poorer health conditions and fewer opportunities. Due to the industrialization
of cities, it made them less inhabitable and living conditions were
poorer.(Bauman, n.d.)

Along with the nice single lots and family barbecues and get-togethers came
increased education for suburban areas. Recreational functions increased with
boy scouts, girl scouts, baseball teams, and bicycle riding. Parents also
wanted to increase education for their children. Overall, parents were making a
better life for their children. Urban areas decided it was time to start
cleaning up. “Downtown business, civic, and political elites fashioned the
mechanism for downtown renaissance.” (Ever-changing) Multiple cities creating
housing and planning committees for city revitalization projects. Due to
joblessness and decline, “cities launched a host of anti-smoke pollution,
water, sewer, street, parking, and other urban improvement projects.”(Bauman,
n.d.)

While America was experiencing growth after World War II and urbanization was
taking place, decline in the standard of living and quality of life were
declining in inner-cities. To combat the decline, pollution, and health issues,
cities attempted to make the living situations better. Some of the renewal
process was seen as misguided, and did not work entirely. Suburban areas
increased with white population while minorities were thrust into inner city
life and lower standards of living. Americans were pulled toward suburban areas
for health reasons and less pollution, with the trade-off of more room to
spread. This was all part of American history and expansion during the
post-World War II era.

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