Reagan begins his tribute to the Challenger astronauts by acknowledging how the shuttle accident has appropriately postponed his planned State of the Union address and by expressing the depth of his and his wife’s personal grief

Reagan begins his tribute to the Challenger astronauts by acknowledging how the shuttle accident has appropriately postponed his planned State of the Union address and by expressing the depth of his and his wife’s personal grief. He demonstrates pathos by connecting with the emotions of the audience, admitting that he and Nancy are “pained to the core” (3), that today is rightfully a “day for mourning and remembering” (2-3), and that the accident is “truly a national loss.” He joins in this time of mourning in order to unify the nation and humbly admit that “we share this pain with all of the people of our country” (4). This outpouring of emotion from the president conveys a calming tone that reassures the Nation that their grief is both understandable and proper.