Patient Education Name Institution Instructor Course Date Patient Education Defining CAM Complementary and alternative medicine

Patient Education
Name
Institution
Instructor
Course
Date
Patient Education
Defining CAM
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) involves medical practices and procedures, which are different from the standard medical practices. Complementary practices are used along the standard medical practices where else alternative medicine can be used instead of the standard medical treatments (Falvo, 2011). These treatments are meant to promote the health status of patients besides the standard treatments promoting the effectiveness of the standard medical procedures. CAM therapies include food supplements and other medical products with a large composition including natural products, as they are considered safe and effective (Falvo, 2011).
Describing the Patient Who Uses CAM the Most
Patients can use CAM all across the world depending on the health condition and the available CAM options. Patients with more than one medical conditions use CAM treatment the most (Micozzi, Koop, Haramati, & Lundberg, 2015). This is because the standard medical care may be costly or not effective in addressing the conditions present. This leads to the patient in using CAM to balance and increase the effectiveness of the medical treatment implemented (Micozzi et al., 2015). Most educated patients also use CAM the most as they clearly understand as to what pertains to the CAM medications.
Common Misconceptions about CAM
One of the misconceptions about CAM is that patients choose CAM based on their background, their education level, or social status (Falvo, 2011). The use of CAM includes the less educated and people from particular cultural backgrounds, which have been termed as untrue. There is no specific group favored for the use of CAM therapy and any one can choose CAM including the poor and the rich in the society (Falvo, 2011). CAM can also be used by patients as a combination of the standard medical care and not necessarily as an end result after medical care has failed. CAM has the option of being integrated with the standard medical treatment as well as being used as a substitute of the medical care (Falvo, 2011).
Methods of Including the Use of CAM in Patient Education
Patients can be educated on how to integrate CAM into their lives due to the benefits associated with CAM in addressing most of the health issues (Micozzi et al., 2015). CAM can also be used to prevent the development of certain health conditions. Research has indicated positive results in the use of CAM in the prevention of diseases. Healthcare professionals can include CAM in their patient education and any issues that may arise in the use of CAM adequately addressed (Micozzi et al., 2015). This is because patients may be unaware of the available CAM options but since healthcare practitioners are well informed in matters of health, they can integrate the use of CAM in their discussions with patients. The healthcare professionals should as well be supportive on the decisions made by the patients regarding the type of treatment and medication to be used (Micozzi et al., 2015).
The Safe Use of CAM
For the effective use of CAM, there are safety procedures to be ensured which will prevent any harm that may affect the patients. Since most of the CAM products are natural products, a majority of individuals have the notion that natural products are not harmful to the human body (Falvo, 2011). This is not true as some herbs and other traditional supplements may have a negative effect to the patients if used in the wrong dosage. This may even worsen the situation and a good understanding is necessary before using CAM treatments (Falvo, 2011). The patient must be well informed on the relationship and how traditional and the standard medications interact. This brings the importance of a professional healthcare in deciding if to use CAM medications (Falvo, 2011).
Ways in Which Conventional Medicine and CAM Can Be Integrated
Conventional medicine and CAM can be integrated through guidance from a professional healthcare professional. Healthcare professionals are better informed about the CAM medications as well as the conventional medications and are better placed to provide guidance on the integration of the conventional medicine and CAM medications (Micozzi et al., 2015). Healthcare professionals should engage the patients considering using CAM as the type of treatment. The available CAM medications should be carefully analyzed to determine any negative interactions with conventional medications (Micozzi et al., 2015).
Defining Ethical Theories, Ethical Principles, and Values
Ethical theories involve the study of ethical behaviors and their influence on certain results. Healthcare professionals should make decisions based on the ethical theories, which are aimed to guide their behavior in their practice (Micozzi et al., 2015). Ethical principles are also meant to ensure that the healthcare professionals practice according to the required behavior requirements. Ethical principles involve being in line with the set rules and standards which are meant to ensure the right conduct in the nursing practice (Micozzi et al., 2015). This provides a standard general framework within the nursing practice in terms of moral conduct of healthcare professionals. Values include personal ethics, which are as a result of influence from cultural background, personal characteristics, religious preferences, and past experiences (Micozzi et al., 2015).
Examples of Ethical Issues in Patient Education and Compliance, and Ways in Which an Effective Professional/Patient Relationship and a Poor Health Professional/Patient Relationship Can Impact These Issues
Some of the ethical issues in patient education and compliance include being bias. Being bias involves healthcare practitioners directing patients to follow their choice of treatment neglecting the participation and the choice of patients in deciding which treatment choices they prefer (Bird & IGI Global, 2015). This may result in physical as well as mental harm to the patient, which may have negative outcomes in the treatment process to the patient (Bird & IGI Global, 2015). Confidentiality is also another issue in patient education. It is the responsibility of all healthcare professionals to keep patient information private and a criminal offense to give out information about a patient (Bird & IGI Global, 2015).
An effective professional/patient relationship will positively impact the issue of confidentiality as well as being bias in that healthcare professionals will respect and adhere to the ethical standards creating a suitable environment which will lead to improved healthcare results (Bird & IGI Global, 2015). A poor health professional/patient relationship can impact these issues negatively as it is important for healthcare professionals to understand their patients in order to be informed on the best strategies to implement as well as apply the ethical standards in his/her practice (Bird & IGI Global, 2015).
Defining Ethical Patient Education Practice
Ethical patient education practices involves the process by which healthcare professionals impart helpful information to the patients which is aimed to improve their health status while applying the required ethical standards (Graffigna, 2016). These standards are meant to ensure that every patient has access to unbiased patient education and ensure that there is transparency in the education process (Graffigna, 2016). These practices also enable the patient to have information on all the available options, which are essential in the treatment process, which will enable the patients in making informed decisions based on the information provided by the healthcare professional (Graffigna, 2016).
The Purpose of Informed Consent
Informed consent is used by healthcare professionals in providing advice to the patients on invasive procedures. Any procedure, which presents a risk to the patient, must involve an informed consent (Devettere, 2016). Consent is an acknowledgement that the patient is aware and has given the permission for any procedure to be carried out. Informed consent on the other hand means that the besides the patient acknowledging and giving the permission for a procedure to be undertaken, he/she is informed on the procedure which is provided by the healthcare practitioners (Devettere, 2016). Informed consent is meant to give the patient control over any procedure undertaken and may be withdrawn any time the patient has a change of mind (Devettere, 2016).
Factors Determining the Patient’s Ability to Give Informed Consent
Some of the factors, which determine the patient’s ability to give informed consent, include the relationship between the healthcare professional and the patient (Devettere, 2016). A good relationship will increase the chances of a patient in giving an informed decision as patients will not feel pressured to give the consent and will be out of their own will (Devettere, 2016). A bad relationship between the patient and the healthcare professionals will also lead to inadequate information provided to the patients, which may affect their decision to give an informed consent. Lack of enough information may lead to a patient refusing to give a consent for a medical procedure (Devettere, 2016).
Sample Informed Consent Form
1. I, (Patient’s name)………………………………………………………………………………………………

Agree that I will have (medical procedure)……………………………………………………

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At (name of facility)…………………………………………………………………………………..

The reason for this procedure is (medical condition)………………………………………

Which will be done on………………………………………………………………………………..
The procedure will be supervised by…………………………………………………………….

2. I have talked to my doctor and family about:
What the procedure is and what will happen.

The benefits of the procedure.

Risks involved and any harm that can be as a result of the procedure.

Effects of the procedure.

Other treatment options available. The risks and benefits of these options.

Outcome if I decline to the treatment procedure.

Recovery process and time.

Medications to be used during and after the procedure and their effects.

3. I agree that: (a tick to what I agree and a cross to what I reject)
That my blood will be tested for HIV and other tests required for the procedure.

Medical pictures and videos may be taken for educational purposes.

The doctor may change the procedure if problems arise during the procedure.

No promise of a positive outcome and the results may depend on the successful completion of the procedure.

Patient’s name………………………………………………………………………..
Patient’s signature…………………………………………………………………..

Date……………………………………………………………………………………..

Doctor’s name………………………………………………………………………..

Doctor’s signature…………………………………………………………………..

Date………………………………………………………………………………………

The Process of Communication to Use with the Patient and the Family When Obtaining Informed Consent
Due to the sensitive information related to adverse results that may occur during a procedure, most healthcare professionals are afraid to discuss these effects with the patients as well as their families (Falvo, 2011). This is because such discussions may cause fear and anxiety and patients may change their mind as a result. However, it is important that healthcare professionals provide this important information as required by the law (Falvo, 2011). The healthcare professional can do this in an ethical manner by being compassionate, truthful, and in a caring way to relieve any anxiety that may be associated with a particular procedure. This is important in enabling a patient or the family members to give an informed consent (Falvo, 2011).

References
Bird, J. L., ; IGI Global. (2015). Innovative collaborative practice and reflection in patient education. Hershey, Pennsylvania IGI Global.

Devettere, R. J. (2016). Practical decision making in health care ethics – cases, concepts, and the virtue of prudence. Georgetown University Press.

Falvo, D. R. (2011). Effective patient education: A guide to increased adherence. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett.

Graffigna, G. (2016). Promoting patient engagement and participation for effective healthcare reform. Hershey, Pennsylvania IGI Global.

Micozzi, M. S., Koop, C. E., Haramati, A., ; Lundberg, G. D. (2015). Fundamentals of complementary and alternative medicine. St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier.

Patient Education
Name
Institution
Instructor
Course
Date
Patient Education
Defining CAM
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) involves medical practices and procedures, which are different from the standard medical practices. Complementary practices are used along the standard medical practices where else alternative medicine can be used instead of the standard medical treatments (Falvo, 2011). These treatments are meant to promote the health status of patients besides the standard treatments promoting the effectiveness of the standard medical procedures. CAM therapies include food supplements and other medical products with a large composition including natural products, as they are considered safe and effective (Falvo, 2011).
Describing the Patient Who Uses CAM the Most
Patients can use CAM all across the world depending on the health condition and the available CAM options. Patients with more than one medical conditions use CAM treatment the most (Micozzi, Koop, Haramati, & Lundberg, 2015). This is because the standard medical care may be costly or not effective in addressing the conditions present. This leads to the patient in using CAM to balance and increase the effectiveness of the medical treatment implemented (Micozzi et al., 2015). Most educated patients also use CAM the most as they clearly understand as to what pertains to the CAM medications.
Common Misconceptions about CAM
One of the misconceptions about CAM is that patients choose CAM based on their background, their education level, or social status (Falvo, 2011). The use of CAM includes the less educated and people from particular cultural backgrounds, which have been termed as untrue. There is no specific group favored for the use of CAM therapy and any one can choose CAM including the poor and the rich in the society (Falvo, 2011). CAM can also be used by patients as a combination of the standard medical care and not necessarily as an end result after medical care has failed. CAM has the option of being integrated with the standard medical treatment as well as being used as a substitute of the medical care (Falvo, 2011).
Methods of Including the Use of CAM in Patient Education
Patients can be educated on how to integrate CAM into their lives due to the benefits associated with CAM in addressing most of the health issues (Micozzi et al., 2015). CAM can also be used to prevent the development of certain health conditions. Research has indicated positive results in the use of CAM in the prevention of diseases. Healthcare professionals can include CAM in their patient education and any issues that may arise in the use of CAM adequately addressed (Micozzi et al., 2015). This is because patients may be unaware of the available CAM options but since healthcare practitioners are well informed in matters of health, they can integrate the use of CAM in their discussions with patients. The healthcare professionals should as well be supportive on the decisions made by the patients regarding the type of treatment and medication to be used (Micozzi et al., 2015).
The Safe Use of CAM
For the effective use of CAM, there are safety procedures to be ensured which will prevent any harm that may affect the patients. Since most of the CAM products are natural products, a majority of individuals have the notion that natural products are not harmful to the human body (Falvo, 2011). This is not true as some herbs and other traditional supplements may have a negative effect to the patients if used in the wrong dosage. This may even worsen the situation and a good understanding is necessary before using CAM treatments (Falvo, 2011). The patient must be well informed on the relationship and how traditional and the standard medications interact. This brings the importance of a professional healthcare in deciding if to use CAM medications (Falvo, 2011).
Ways in Which Conventional Medicine and CAM Can Be Integrated
Conventional medicine and CAM can be integrated through guidance from a professional healthcare professional. Healthcare professionals are better informed about the CAM medications as well as the conventional medications and are better placed to provide guidance on the integration of the conventional medicine and CAM medications (Micozzi et al., 2015). Healthcare professionals should engage the patients considering using CAM as the type of treatment. The available CAM medications should be carefully analyzed to determine any negative interactions with conventional medications (Micozzi et al., 2015).
Defining Ethical Theories, Ethical Principles, and Values
Ethical theories involve the study of ethical behaviors and their influence on certain results. Healthcare professionals should make decisions based on the ethical theories, which are aimed to guide their behavior in their practice (Micozzi et al., 2015). Ethical principles are also meant to ensure that the healthcare professionals practice according to the required behavior requirements. Ethical principles involve being in line with the set rules and standards which are meant to ensure the right conduct in the nursing practice (Micozzi et al., 2015). This provides a standard general framework within the nursing practice in terms of moral conduct of healthcare professionals. Values include personal ethics, which are as a result of influence from cultural background, personal characteristics, religious preferences, and past experiences (Micozzi et al., 2015).
Examples of Ethical Issues in Patient Education and Compliance, and Ways in Which an Effective Professional/Patient Relationship and a Poor Health Professional/Patient Relationship Can Impact These Issues
Some of the ethical issues in patient education and compliance include being bias. Being bias involves healthcare practitioners directing patients to follow their choice of treatment neglecting the participation and the choice of patients in deciding which treatment choices they prefer (Bird & IGI Global, 2015). This may result in physical as well as mental harm to the patient, which may have negative outcomes in the treatment process to the patient (Bird & IGI Global, 2015). Confidentiality is also another issue in patient education. It is the responsibility of all healthcare professionals to keep patient information private and a criminal offense to give out information about a patient (Bird & IGI Global, 2015).
An effective professional/patient relationship will positively impact the issue of confidentiality as well as being bias in that healthcare professionals will respect and adhere to the ethical standards creating a suitable environment which will lead to improved healthcare results (Bird & IGI Global, 2015). A poor health professional/patient relationship can impact these issues negatively as it is important for healthcare professionals to understand their patients in order to be informed on the best strategies to implement as well as apply the ethical standards in his/her practice (Bird & IGI Global, 2015).
Defining Ethical Patient Education Practice
Ethical patient education practices involves the process by which healthcare professionals impart helpful information to the patients which is aimed to improve their health status while applying the required ethical standards (Graffigna, 2016). These standards are meant to ensure that every patient has access to unbiased patient education and ensure that there is transparency in the education process (Graffigna, 2016). These practices also enable the patient to have information on all the available options, which are essential in the treatment process, which will enable the patients in making informed decisions based on the information provided by the healthcare professional (Graffigna, 2016).
The Purpose of Informed Consent
Informed consent is used by healthcare professionals in providing advice to the patients on invasive procedures. Any procedure, which presents a risk to the patient, must involve an informed consent (Devettere, 2016). Consent is an acknowledgement that the patient is aware and has given the permission for any procedure to be carried out. Informed consent on the other hand means that the besides the patient acknowledging and giving the permission for a procedure to be undertaken, he/she is informed on the procedure which is provided by the healthcare practitioners (Devettere, 2016). Informed consent is meant to give the patient control over any procedure undertaken and may be withdrawn any time the patient has a change of mind (Devettere, 2016).
Factors Determining the Patient’s Ability to Give Informed Consent
Some of the factors, which determine the patient’s ability to give informed consent, include the relationship between the healthcare professional and the patient (Devettere, 2016). A good relationship will increase the chances of a patient in giving an informed decision as patients will not feel pressured to give the consent and will be out of their own will (Devettere, 2016). A bad relationship between the patient and the healthcare professionals will also lead to inadequate information provided to the patients, which may affect their decision to give an informed consent. Lack of enough information may lead to a patient refusing to give a consent for a medical procedure (Devettere, 2016).
Sample Informed Consent Form
1. I, (Patient’s name)………………………………………………………………………………………………

Agree that I will have (medical procedure)……………………………………………………

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For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

At (name of facility)…………………………………………………………………………………..

The reason for this procedure is (medical condition)………………………………………

Which will be done on………………………………………………………………………………..
The procedure will be supervised by…………………………………………………………….

2. I have talked to my doctor and family about:
What the procedure is and what will happen.

The benefits of the procedure.

Risks involved and any harm that can be as a result of the procedure.

Effects of the procedure.

Other treatment options available. The risks and benefits of these options.

Outcome if I decline to the treatment procedure.

Recovery process and time.

Medications to be used during and after the procedure and their effects.

3. I agree that: (a tick to what I agree and a cross to what I reject)
That my blood will be tested for HIV and other tests required for the procedure.

Medical pictures and videos may be taken for educational purposes.

The doctor may change the procedure if problems arise during the procedure.

No promise of a positive outcome and the results may depend on the successful completion of the procedure.

Patient’s name………………………………………………………………………..
Patient’s signature…………………………………………………………………..

Date……………………………………………………………………………………..

Doctor’s name………………………………………………………………………..

Doctor’s signature…………………………………………………………………..

Date………………………………………………………………………………………

The Process of Communication to Use with the Patient and the Family When Obtaining Informed Consent
Due to the sensitive information related to adverse results that may occur during a procedure, most healthcare professionals are afraid to discuss these effects with the patients as well as their families (Falvo, 2011). This is because such discussions may cause fear and anxiety and patients may change their mind as a result. However, it is important that healthcare professionals provide this important information as required by the law (Falvo, 2011). The healthcare professional can do this in an ethical manner by being compassionate, truthful, and in a caring way to relieve any anxiety that may be associated with a particular procedure. This is important in enabling a patient or the family members to give an informed consent (Falvo, 2011).

References
Bird, J. L., ; IGI Global. (2015). Innovative collaborative practice and reflection in patient education. Hershey, Pennsylvania IGI Global.

Devettere, R. J. (2016). Practical decision making in health care ethics – cases, concepts, and the virtue of prudence. Georgetown University Press.

Falvo, D. R. (2011). Effective patient education: A guide to increased adherence. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett.

Graffigna, G. (2016). Promoting patient engagement and participation for effective healthcare reform. Hershey, Pennsylvania IGI Global.

Micozzi, M. S., Koop, C. E., Haramati, A., ; Lundberg, G. D. (2015). Fundamentals of complementary and alternative medicine. St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier.

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