p.p1 and +6% respectively), probably because those butters were

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica}
p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Helvetica}
span.s1 {font: 10.0px Helvetica}

The French are the largest consumers of butter in the world. France is therefore a very
important domestic market for the sales of this product. They are mainly made in supermarkets
which offer a wide range of butters. The price of butter has been relatively stable over the last 5
years, with a more
recent surge in prices.
We cannot provide an
accurate analysis of the
recent price increase
because the most recent
data are not yet
available. However, we
will try to provide some
answers to this
question.
After a year of
growth in 2014, the
volumes of butter sold
fell in 2015 (-16%) due to a sharp drop in Charentes-Poitou butter sales (-20%). Butters from
Bresse and Isigny were up (+21% and +6% respectively), probably because those butters were
featured in culinary TV shows for their quality. French butter manufacture rose slightly over
the same period (about 1 %).
The butter market sharply accelerated its sales in 2015 from +2% by volume between
2013 and 2014 and about + 17% between 2014 and 2015 (+ about 17% in value). In
comparison, non-AOP (Appellation d’origine protégée; meaning registered names) butters
15
remained stable in volume but with stronger growth in value (+1.5%). In 2015, AOP butters
accounted for about 4% of the butter market in supermarkets and hard discount, up 0.6 points
compared to 2014, which is a significant rise.
The price paid by the consumer for AOP butter fell by about 0,5% in 2015, while the
price of butters without AOP rose by about 1%. AOP butters sell 16% more expensive than
non-AOP butters. Sweet butter represents the majority of sales in French Supermarkets: It
represents more than 80% of sales for appellations but only reaches 60% outside the appellation
(AOP). Salted butter is a negligible segment.
International sales
The OECD forecasts a 19% increase in butter consumption by 2026. This means that
there is demand for butter that is an opportunity for French producers. However, today, French
foreign trade in butter is in deficit:
• Imports: 164 000 tons – € 504 million
• Exports: 76 000 tons – € 297 million
As one can see on the graph below, France is the first importer of butter among the
European countries, followed at a distance by Germany and Belgium. The last nine countries on
the list are the ones that import the less among the countries listed below. One can see that the
imports of France have risen of close to 50,000 tons since 2011, but not as much as the
Netherlands, which has imported almost 100,000 tons more since 2010.
The graph below compares the exports of butter inside and outside the European Union
for the different countries of the E.U in 2016. The Netherlands is by far the country that exports
16
the most in the E.U., followed at a distance by Ireland, Belgium and Germany. France is the
fifth exporter of butter inside the E.U., but the second exporter of butter outside the E.U. after
the Netherlands.
China is a big buyer of French butter. Indeed, it is synonymous with quality: many
Chinese people do not have confidence when it comes to butter made in New Zealand.
In France, between January and august 2016, exportations of butter toward China raised
by +46%. However, exports do not exceed imports for French butter in 2016.
If China is a major player in the butter market because it buys a lot, another country has
to mentioned. Over the years 2006 to 2010, butter sales worldwide increased by approximately
13%. Over these five years, the highest sales volume occurred in India: India’s share of world
butter consumption fluctuated between about 34% in 2006 and about 39% in 2010.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica}
p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Helvetica}
span.s1 {font: 10.0px Helvetica}

The French are the largest consumers of butter in the world. France is therefore a very
important domestic market for the sales of this product. They are mainly made in supermarkets
which offer a wide range of butters. The price of butter has been relatively stable over the last 5
years, with a more
recent surge in prices.
We cannot provide an
accurate analysis of the
recent price increase
because the most recent
data are not yet
available. However, we
will try to provide some
answers to this
question.
After a year of
growth in 2014, the
volumes of butter sold
fell in 2015 (-16%) due to a sharp drop in Charentes-Poitou butter sales (-20%). Butters from
Bresse and Isigny were up (+21% and +6% respectively), probably because those butters were
featured in culinary TV shows for their quality. French butter manufacture rose slightly over
the same period (about 1 %).
The butter market sharply accelerated its sales in 2015 from +2% by volume between
2013 and 2014 and about + 17% between 2014 and 2015 (+ about 17% in value). In
comparison, non-AOP (Appellation d’origine protégée; meaning registered names) butters
15
remained stable in volume but with stronger growth in value (+1.5%). In 2015, AOP butters
accounted for about 4% of the butter market in supermarkets and hard discount, up 0.6 points
compared to 2014, which is a significant rise.
The price paid by the consumer for AOP butter fell by about 0,5% in 2015, while the
price of butters without AOP rose by about 1%. AOP butters sell 16% more expensive than
non-AOP butters. Sweet butter represents the majority of sales in French Supermarkets: It
represents more than 80% of sales for appellations but only reaches 60% outside the appellation
(AOP). Salted butter is a negligible segment.
International sales
The OECD forecasts a 19% increase in butter consumption by 2026. This means that
there is demand for butter that is an opportunity for French producers. However, today, French
foreign trade in butter is in deficit:
• Imports: 164 000 tons – € 504 million
• Exports: 76 000 tons – € 297 million
As one can see on the graph below, France is the first importer of butter among the
European countries, followed at a distance by Germany and Belgium. The last nine countries on
the list are the ones that import the less among the countries listed below. One can see that the
imports of France have risen of close to 50,000 tons since 2011, but not as much as the
Netherlands, which has imported almost 100,000 tons more since 2010.
The graph below compares the exports of butter inside and outside the European Union
for the different countries of the E.U in 2016. The Netherlands is by far the country that exports
16
the most in the E.U., followed at a distance by Ireland, Belgium and Germany. France is the
fifth exporter of butter inside the E.U., but the second exporter of butter outside the E.U. after
the Netherlands.
China is a big buyer of French butter. Indeed, it is synonymous with quality: many
Chinese people do not have confidence when it comes to butter made in New Zealand.
In France, between January and august 2016, exportations of butter toward China raised
by +46%. However, exports do not exceed imports for French butter in 2016.
If China is a major player in the butter market because it buys a lot, another country has
to mentioned. Over the years 2006 to 2010, butter sales worldwide increased by approximately
13%. Over these five years, the highest sales volume occurred in India: India’s share of world
butter consumption fluctuated between about 34% in 2006 and about 39% in 2010.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now
x

Hi!
I'm Elaine!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out