Macdonald educating parents on this important topic. The article

Macdonald and
Hauber state that children are more likely than adults to be involved in
traumatic brain injuries, including concussions, and take longer to recover. These
sports-related concussions can lead to lifelong impairments of a child’s
memory, behaviour, learning, and emotional stability. The authors state that
while sports personnel are well-informed on sports-related concussions, information
and preventative interventions are not well-disseminated among parents. This
article presents their study conducted to investigate the impact of an
educational program on parental perception, awareness, and knowledge of sports-related
concussions in parents of children involved in contact sports. Sports-related
concussions are underreported by parents due both to the perception that they
are minor injuries and to the lack of knowledge of early and delayed symptoms. Macdonald
and Hauber found that parents are concerned with their children’s well-being
but are overwhelmed by medical terminology. As such, they may leave topics such
as sports-related concussions to coaches and health care providers to assess,
treat, and teach their children about. While the study suggests that parents
know what educational approaches work for them when they do seek out
information, the authors note that one educational intervention is not efficient
in encouraging parents to be proactive.

            This article is relevant to the
presentation on sports-related concussions because the authors address the lack
of knowledge parents have regarding sports-related concussions and identify opportunities
for educating parents on this important topic. The article focuses on educating
parents; however, the authors raise the important issue that if parents do not
have the knowledge, they cannot educate their own children. If parents are not
informed caregivers, then the importance of educating children on preventing,
identifying, and managing sports-related concussions must be a focus in public
health. The article is also relevant to the presentation because it offers
insight into which educational methods parents are most likely to use to seek
out follow-up information regarding sports-related concussions. Since parents
in the study ranked handouts as the information tool most likely to motivate
them to seek further information, a handout can be given to parents through
schools, community centres, or sports teams to reinforce the material being
taught to their children about brain injury prevention, detection, and
management. In addition, it is crucial that parents and children understand the
severity of the issue, as sports-related concussions are often not reported due
to the perception that concussions are minor injuries. In educating both children
and their parents, a dialogue can be established to draw attention to
sports-related concussions.

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            This article is relevant to my
future nursing praxis because it can guide how I will educate parents of
children with sports-related concussions. Health care providers, including
nurses, can influence parents regarding their child’s health. If I am treating
a pediatric patient with a sports-related concussion, I will need to assess the
parents’ knowledge of the injury and recovery. I may also provide them with a
handout, so they have access to further information on how to manage their
child’s injury, what to expect during recovery, and when to seek medical
attention. If I am a nurse in a clinic or emergency department, I can use
assessment and discharge as teaching moments for parents and children and
encourage them to preemptively seek knowledge regarding sports-related concussions.

Since parents may be intimidated by medical terminology, I will need to use
language that the parents and children can understand so they can collaborate
in the care of the pediatric patient. In my future praxis, I may need to teach
children participating in contact sports to identify the signs and symptoms of
a concussion, so they can assist their parents in determining when they need
medical attention. I could also recommend continuing education through
community centres, school events, and online modules for parents to learn more
about sports-related concussions and how to care for their child. As a nurse, I
will have a role to play in both community and hospital settings to increase
communication and education among parents, children, coaches, and health care
providers.

 

Macdonald and
Hauber state that children are more likely than adults to be involved in
traumatic brain injuries, including concussions, and take longer to recover. These
sports-related concussions can lead to lifelong impairments of a child’s
memory, behaviour, learning, and emotional stability. The authors state that
while sports personnel are well-informed on sports-related concussions, information
and preventative interventions are not well-disseminated among parents. This
article presents their study conducted to investigate the impact of an
educational program on parental perception, awareness, and knowledge of sports-related
concussions in parents of children involved in contact sports. Sports-related
concussions are underreported by parents due both to the perception that they
are minor injuries and to the lack of knowledge of early and delayed symptoms. Macdonald
and Hauber found that parents are concerned with their children’s well-being
but are overwhelmed by medical terminology. As such, they may leave topics such
as sports-related concussions to coaches and health care providers to assess,
treat, and teach their children about. While the study suggests that parents
know what educational approaches work for them when they do seek out
information, the authors note that one educational intervention is not efficient
in encouraging parents to be proactive.

            This article is relevant to the
presentation on sports-related concussions because the authors address the lack
of knowledge parents have regarding sports-related concussions and identify opportunities
for educating parents on this important topic. The article focuses on educating
parents; however, the authors raise the important issue that if parents do not
have the knowledge, they cannot educate their own children. If parents are not
informed caregivers, then the importance of educating children on preventing,
identifying, and managing sports-related concussions must be a focus in public
health. The article is also relevant to the presentation because it offers
insight into which educational methods parents are most likely to use to seek
out follow-up information regarding sports-related concussions. Since parents
in the study ranked handouts as the information tool most likely to motivate
them to seek further information, a handout can be given to parents through
schools, community centres, or sports teams to reinforce the material being
taught to their children about brain injury prevention, detection, and
management. In addition, it is crucial that parents and children understand the
severity of the issue, as sports-related concussions are often not reported due
to the perception that concussions are minor injuries. In educating both children
and their parents, a dialogue can be established to draw attention to
sports-related concussions.

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For You For Only $13.90/page!


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            This article is relevant to my
future nursing praxis because it can guide how I will educate parents of
children with sports-related concussions. Health care providers, including
nurses, can influence parents regarding their child’s health. If I am treating
a pediatric patient with a sports-related concussion, I will need to assess the
parents’ knowledge of the injury and recovery. I may also provide them with a
handout, so they have access to further information on how to manage their
child’s injury, what to expect during recovery, and when to seek medical
attention. If I am a nurse in a clinic or emergency department, I can use
assessment and discharge as teaching moments for parents and children and
encourage them to preemptively seek knowledge regarding sports-related concussions.

Since parents may be intimidated by medical terminology, I will need to use
language that the parents and children can understand so they can collaborate
in the care of the pediatric patient. In my future praxis, I may need to teach
children participating in contact sports to identify the signs and symptoms of
a concussion, so they can assist their parents in determining when they need
medical attention. I could also recommend continuing education through
community centres, school events, and online modules for parents to learn more
about sports-related concussions and how to care for their child. As a nurse, I
will have a role to play in both community and hospital settings to increase
communication and education among parents, children, coaches, and health care
providers.

 

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