Introduction This experiment is on wind turbines and how different blade lengths may produce different amounts of energy

Introduction
This experiment is on wind turbines and how different blade lengths may produce different amounts of energy. Energy is a power derived from the utilization of physical or chemical resources, especially to provide light and heat or to work machines. These days non renewable resources are running out, so people are trying to find all different renewable resources.
Aim
The aim of this experiment is to find the optional size of blades to maximise the amount of energy generated.
Hypothesis
My hypothesis is that the amount of energy decreases with the longer the blades.
Material
• STELR testing station • STELR model wind turbine
• 2 x STELR multimeters • Connecting leads
• 6 x 150 mm turbine blades set into a hub • Three-speed electric fan
• Extra 150 mm turbine blades • Tape measure or metre ruler
Risk Assessment
What were the risks? why is it risky? How was this risk managed?
Glass beaker If broken could cut you Beaker handled carefully
The turbine It could fall on the ground and brake Position the turbine away from the edge of the The turbine Blade could come loose and hurt someone Wear glasses, ensure all blades aren’t loose
Variables
The independent variable was the length of the blades on the wind turbine (input variable).
The dependent variable was the power generated calculated using voltage and milliamps ( output variable).
The control variable was the time interval (30 seconds) , speed of the fan ( fast), size/power of the fan, distance between the fan and the turbine (50 cm), hub to hub vertical.
Method
1. Equipment was collected
2. The distance between the fan and the turbine was measured to 50 cm
3. The multimeters were set to voltage and milliamps
4. The table were drawn up in our books to record
5. The red coloured turbine was put on
6. The timer starts and so does the fan
7. At 30 seconds we record the voltage and the milliamps
8. Do steps 6 and 7, (2) more times
9. Turn off the fan
10. The blue turbine is put on
11. The timer starts and so does the fan
12. At 30 seconds we record the voltage and the milliamps
13. Do steps 10 and 11 (2) more times
14. Turn off the fan
15. The yellow turbine is put on
16. The timer starts and so does the fan
17. At 30 seconds we record the voltage and the milliamps
18. Do steps 16 and 17, (2) more times
19. Turn off the fan
20. Pack up the turbines
21. Turn off the multimeters

Results
See figure 1 for results in volts
See figure 2 for results in milliamps

Discussion

Questions
1. Will Earth ever run out of energy? Justify your explanation using the law of conservation of energy.
No the earth will never run out of energy unless we don’t start usually using renewable recourses now.
2. Explain the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy, provide an example of each.
Renewable energy is energy that never stops and never runs out EG. wind. Non-renewable energy is energy that burns and turns into gas EG. Coal.
3. Explain how solar-cells function.
It works by allowing particals of light (photons) to know electrons free from atoms.
4. What are wind turbines and how do they generate electricity?
Wind turbines are a source for energy that is renewable. This source uses kinetic power of the wind. The blades are connected to the rotor and the rotor is connected to the main shaft, which spins the generator which then creates the energy.
5. How might wind turbines benefit society?
The changes it would make are: Save lots of money, never run out of it, better for a healthier pollution.
6. Based on the findings of the experiment, what recommendations could be made to commercial wind turbine manufacturers?
The recommendations are to keep the blades a bit smaller which will create more power
Conclusion
My hypothesis (My hypothesis is that the amount of energy decreases with the longer the blades.) was sorta true although the biggest blades (red) did not create much energy, the smallest ones (yellow) did not create the most. The medium sized blades (blue) create the most energy.
Reflection
I think my group did pretty well! And I would say that our results are pretty, usually and nothing different.
Bibliography
Energy.gov. (2018). How Do Wind Turbines Work? | Department of Energy. online Available at: https://www.energy.gov/eere/wind/how-do-wind-turbines-work Accessed 31 May 2018.

Science, L. (2018). How Do Solar Panels Work?. online Live Science. Available at: https://www.livescience.com/41995-how-do-solar-panels-work.html Accessed 31 May 2018.

AENews. (2018). Wind Turbines. online Available at: http://www.alternative-energy-news.info/technology/wind-power/wind-turbines/ Accessed 31 May 2018.