He, reports that limited the space available in

He, therefore, asserts that “the internet as it wires
millions of individuals as potential information experts into global
communications infrastructure provides an ideal platform for improving
journalism by incorporating the expertise of people of people outside” (p.
55).  Networked journalism has
enabled journalists to tell stories much better, taking advantage of various
multimedia components. By doing so, social media will lead to improved
journalism as some stories
are told best in print while some are visual and require video, photos, and/or graphics.                      Furthermore, social media
has provided an opportunity for traditional media journalists to provide
comprehensive accounts of news stories. Unlike traditional newspapers and
broadcast news reports that limited the space available in a
newspaper/broadcast, the online setting offers virtually unlimited column space
and airtime. This has further enabled informal collaboration of journalistic
work through crowd-sourcing, which further adds more depth to the news
produced. Scholars argue that rather than relying on a single journalist to
consider or present all sides of the story social media enables a more
extensive and potentially more diverse community of users to collaborate as
producers of a more comprehensive form of news coverage that would have been
possible under the pressures of traditional media. As per Gans (2003), this
leads to “multiperspectival news reporting, encompassing fact and opinion
reflecting all possible perspectives” (p. 103). He further pointed out that
through collaboration, social media provides space for presenting unrepresented
perspectives, unpublicized facts, and unrepresented or seldom reported parts of
the population. By doing so, social media is helping traditional news reporters to interact with readers and sources. Such
interaction not only allows journalists to get instant feedback on their work
but also to gather meaningful tips and build valuable relationships with
audiences (Quigley, 2010).                                                                                                   Additionally,
social media has benefited the journalism profession through increasing
interactivity thereby enabling even the younger audience to participate. This
has not only improved the quality of stories as suggested above but also
enhanced the potential of the media to attract a younger audience who happen to
be the next generation of news consumers. According Newman (2009), social
networks “score well with young people, the demographic group which newspapers
fear will never buy their products and which is beginning to desert   traditional broadcast news and current
affairs programmes” (p. 41). The appeal to younger population derives from the
interactive media experience that young people have become accustomed to
through the use of other interactive devices such as instant messenger and
computer games which promotes a two-way street of communication (Bowman and
Willis, 2003). The interactive quality of social media has therefore been
assumed by traditional media and is proving to be important in helping news
media reclaim audiences’ trust by involving them in the news making process.

 

 

 

 

 

A Guardian journalist acknowledged:                                                                                                we
are using user generated content not as a primary source but to extend the life
of       stories, as a way of adding more
perspective and insight, not just as way to let people talk     amongst themselves but actually with a
purpose to generate more leads and more insight”          (Newman, 2009: p. 13).                                                                                       
Collaborating and having a conversation with audience members extends
news stories and also increases retention, understanding and gives more room
for sharing and discussing news stories.                  Apart
from the above, social media is an opportunity for journalists as it has led to
increased trust in the media through promoting participatory engagement.
Scholars believe participatory journalism provides media companies with the
potential to develop a more loyal and trustworthy relationship with their
audiences. This engagement can be achieved through reporters writing a story
and then asking the audience to have their input through providing tips,
feedback, and first-hand accounts that confirm a story’s premise or take it in
a different direction. Bowman and Willis (2003) noted that:                                                                                          Involving an audience, either small
or large, in the creation of content also give them a     sense of ownership – an affinity with the media brand that they
believe they are not             getting
today – as well as a more intimate relationship with the storytellers (p.
53).        An example of such
initiatives that have proved a success include the CNN iReport platform that
invites content from users which are then vetted and verified by its team of
experts before being used.                                                                                                                                                       To
conclude, given the numerous arguments that show the advantages provided by
social media towards the practice of journalism including providing
opportunities for collaboration, networked journalism, and comprehensive
accounts, I maintain that even in the social media era journalists are still
relevant, probably even more relevant now. While the negative impact of social
media including the challenge to media hegemony, dominance in breaking news and
dominance in audience engagements can never be taken for granted, the role of
journalists as filters and mediators remain crucial. Newman (2009) capture the
whole argument when he said, “social networks provide competition to
traditional publishers for consumer attention and at the same time they are
opening up new ways of engaging and connecting with audiences” (p. 42). Despite
the paranoia that social media is quickly taking the control of traditional
journalists thereby making them irrelevant, the absence of appropriate
journalistic training means citizen journalists are unable to effectively
provide a clear account of events, leaving room for conservative journalists as
a voice of authority. As a result, any conclusion dismissing traditional media
journalists are still too early while at the same time glorifying social media
as a replacement of traditional journalism is premature.

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He, therefore, asserts that “the internet as it wires
millions of individuals as potential information experts into global
communications infrastructure provides an ideal platform for improving
journalism by incorporating the expertise of people of people outside” (p.
55).  Networked journalism has
enabled journalists to tell stories much better, taking advantage of various
multimedia components. By doing so, social media will lead to improved
journalism as some stories
are told best in print while some are visual and require video, photos, and/or graphics.                      Furthermore, social media
has provided an opportunity for traditional media journalists to provide
comprehensive accounts of news stories. Unlike traditional newspapers and
broadcast news reports that limited the space available in a
newspaper/broadcast, the online setting offers virtually unlimited column space
and airtime. This has further enabled informal collaboration of journalistic
work through crowd-sourcing, which further adds more depth to the news
produced. Scholars argue that rather than relying on a single journalist to
consider or present all sides of the story social media enables a more
extensive and potentially more diverse community of users to collaborate as
producers of a more comprehensive form of news coverage that would have been
possible under the pressures of traditional media. As per Gans (2003), this
leads to “multiperspectival news reporting, encompassing fact and opinion
reflecting all possible perspectives” (p. 103). He further pointed out that
through collaboration, social media provides space for presenting unrepresented
perspectives, unpublicized facts, and unrepresented or seldom reported parts of
the population. By doing so, social media is helping traditional news reporters to interact with readers and sources. Such
interaction not only allows journalists to get instant feedback on their work
but also to gather meaningful tips and build valuable relationships with
audiences (Quigley, 2010).                                                                                                   Additionally,
social media has benefited the journalism profession through increasing
interactivity thereby enabling even the younger audience to participate. This
has not only improved the quality of stories as suggested above but also
enhanced the potential of the media to attract a younger audience who happen to
be the next generation of news consumers. According Newman (2009), social
networks “score well with young people, the demographic group which newspapers
fear will never buy their products and which is beginning to desert   traditional broadcast news and current
affairs programmes” (p. 41). The appeal to younger population derives from the
interactive media experience that young people have become accustomed to
through the use of other interactive devices such as instant messenger and
computer games which promotes a two-way street of communication (Bowman and
Willis, 2003). The interactive quality of social media has therefore been
assumed by traditional media and is proving to be important in helping news
media reclaim audiences’ trust by involving them in the news making process.

 

 

 

 

 

A Guardian journalist acknowledged:                                                                                                we
are using user generated content not as a primary source but to extend the life
of       stories, as a way of adding more
perspective and insight, not just as way to let people talk     amongst themselves but actually with a
purpose to generate more leads and more insight”          (Newman, 2009: p. 13).                                                                                       
Collaborating and having a conversation with audience members extends
news stories and also increases retention, understanding and gives more room
for sharing and discussing news stories.                  Apart
from the above, social media is an opportunity for journalists as it has led to
increased trust in the media through promoting participatory engagement.
Scholars believe participatory journalism provides media companies with the
potential to develop a more loyal and trustworthy relationship with their
audiences. This engagement can be achieved through reporters writing a story
and then asking the audience to have their input through providing tips,
feedback, and first-hand accounts that confirm a story’s premise or take it in
a different direction. Bowman and Willis (2003) noted that:                                                                                          Involving an audience, either small
or large, in the creation of content also give them a     sense of ownership – an affinity with the media brand that they
believe they are not             getting
today – as well as a more intimate relationship with the storytellers (p.
53).        An example of such
initiatives that have proved a success include the CNN iReport platform that
invites content from users which are then vetted and verified by its team of
experts before being used.                                                                                                                                                       To
conclude, given the numerous arguments that show the advantages provided by
social media towards the practice of journalism including providing
opportunities for collaboration, networked journalism, and comprehensive
accounts, I maintain that even in the social media era journalists are still
relevant, probably even more relevant now. While the negative impact of social
media including the challenge to media hegemony, dominance in breaking news and
dominance in audience engagements can never be taken for granted, the role of
journalists as filters and mediators remain crucial. Newman (2009) capture the
whole argument when he said, “social networks provide competition to
traditional publishers for consumer attention and at the same time they are
opening up new ways of engaging and connecting with audiences” (p. 42). Despite
the paranoia that social media is quickly taking the control of traditional
journalists thereby making them irrelevant, the absence of appropriate
journalistic training means citizen journalists are unable to effectively
provide a clear account of events, leaving room for conservative journalists as
a voice of authority. As a result, any conclusion dismissing traditional media
journalists are still too early while at the same time glorifying social media
as a replacement of traditional journalism is premature.

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For You For Only $13.90/page!


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