has been made on how the liberationist storylines are similar to ideological crusades that re-establish the primitive othering of Islam and Muslims

has been made on how the liberationist storylines are similar to ideological crusades that re-establish the primitive othering of Islam and Muslims. These crusading enterprises burden feminists and non-feminists, liberals and conservatives alike. It may be lawful, such as the burqa ban in France, or military move as in the US invasion of Afghanistan. On the other hand, the battle that was deceptively undertaken to liberate Muslim women caused enormous hardship and actual harm (Abu-Lughod, 786).
The impression that choice itself is an underprivileged account of freedom, it appears
unmistakably that what actively oppress Muslim women are not in fact their religious affiliations, but rather the complicated entanglements among patriarchal system, poverty, family traditions, and foreign military interventions and occupations. In the patriarchal structure of Afghan family, male family member decides over a woman’s life. Be it the father, brother, husband or brother-in-law, he takes all major decisions and decides for the woman’s life in all aspects.
The idea of white men saving brown women from brown men determines colonialism. The Westerners as colonisers generally appear as the protector, the saviour of brown women from an oppressively patriarchal society. The American bombing and the US intervention in Afghanistan and to create a case for the War on Terrorism, Laura Bush made a statement that the military gains is also of Afghanistan, considering women are no longer imprisoned in their homes. Women can do normal things without the fear of being punished. It was a fight against terrorism as well as a fight for the rights and dignity of Afghan women (Spradley et al, 179).
We might still argue for justice for women, but consider that there might be different ideas about justice and that different women might want, or choose, different futures from what we envision as best. Among the most difficult things for American feminists to accept is that these futures might involve women in developing within a different religious tradition, or traditions that do not have as their primary ideal something called freedom (Kabeer et al, 21).