Gilded Age politics could be accurately described by having complete disregard for the citizens of the era

Gilded Age politics could be accurately described by having complete disregard for the citizens of the era. James Bryce, a British political commentator, states in his article, “For the end of the war coincided with the opening of a time of swift material growth and abounding material propensity in which industry and the development of the west absorbed more and more of the energy of the people. Hence a neglect of details of politics such as had never been seen before.(Doc 1). What Bryce said aimed towards a foreign audience, immagrants. He attempts to talk about the extent to which the American government failed to continue thier involvement in political affairs as it had become too invested in the success of domestic manufacturing and commerce. The policies that made up the party platforms were difficult to distinguish and isolate as the primary objective was to have their respective candidates elected into office to maintain the power of the political machines that had gotten them their position. The spoils system and party patronage were, in part, responsible for the ineffectiveness of administrations during the late nineteenth century as notable individuals who lent their support to a political party were sometimes rewarded with government positions, despite whether or not they were actually qualified. Party loyalty had trumped the idea of an active government that would put an end to the different social and economic issues that developed, skewing the priorities of the United States in the eyes of other countries. The Pendleton Civil Service Act was inevitably enacted to that the privilige of a government office would be granted on merit alone, but nonetheless, corruption was still considered the norm, depicted by the Credit Mobilier Scandal.