College of the rockies FNST 205: Indigenizing Practice

College of the rockies

FNST 205: Indigenizing Practice

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Flexible Assessment

 

Kieran McMonagle

C0058595

January 8, 2018
 

 

 

 

LESSON 1: Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resources

LEARNING GOAL: Students will become familiar with the varied relationships between Indigenous peoples and the natural resources found throughout Canada.

TIMELINE: One 75-minute period

SUBJECT: GCG 1D/P- Canadian Geography

CONNECTIONS TO OTHER SUBJECTS: CHC 2D/P, BTT 10, BTT 20

LESSON OPENER:

Facilitator will define primary, secondary, and tertiary sectors of the economy.

 

Facilitator cue:

 

Primary sector à operation or business that makes direct use of natural resources, usually through extraction and purification. Examples: oil, gas, fishing, forestry, agriculture, mining, etc.

 

Secondary sector à operation or business that produces manufactured or other processed goods. Examples: vehicles, clothing, processed foods, etc.

 

Tertiary sector à operation or business that produces services and may include transportation and distribution of goods. Examples: restaurant, retail stores, entertainment, etc. 

 

LESSON: Students will select a province and identify three Indigenous communities within the province. Using texts and internet resources, the student will then create a list of economic opportunities available to that community. Students will use the attached form for recording information. Students will then be grouped by province to share their findings with group members. Students can add additional information to build upon their form.  

 

ASSESSMENT:

One member from each provincial group will present their findings to the entire class. Students will add to their form throughout each province’s presentation.  All students should have a completed chart by the end of the class. Students are to submit their chart for evaluation.

 

SUGGESTED RESOURCES:

–          Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (Reed et al, Pearson and GoodMinds, 2011)

CGC 1D/P: Indigenous Peoples & Natural Resources     Name: ______________________

Province Name
 

Indigenous Community

Primary Sector

Secondary Sector

 
British Columbia
 

 

 

 

 
Alberta
 

 

 

 

 
Saskatchewan
 

 

 

 

 
Manitoba
 

 

 

 

 
Ontario
 

 

 

 

 
Quebec
 

 

 

 

 
New Brunswick
 

 

 

 

 
Nova Scotia
 

 

 

 

 
Prince Edward Island
 

 

 

 

 
Newfoundland
 

 

 

 

 
Nunavut
 

 

 

 

 
Northwest Territories
 

 

 

 

 
Yukon
 

 

 

 

LESSON 2: Third World Canada

LEARNING GOAL: Students will develop an awareness of living conditions in some Indigenous communities.

TIMELINE: Two 75-minute periods

SUBJECT: NAC 20- Aboriginal People in Canada

CONNECTIONS TO OTHER SUBJECTS: CHV 20, ENG 3U/C, HSE 3E, HSE 4M, HHS 4U/C, HSB 4U, NDA 3M, NDW 4M, NBE 3U/C

LESSON OPENER:

On the board, write the words “quality of life”. Ask students to consider what makes good quality of life? What are the characteristics of poor quality of life? Use a graphic organizer to organize these elements.

 

Facilitator cue: Explain that you will be watching the film Third World Canada; it is important to note that the film is blunt and explicit. The story is one that shows the Canadian government has not been very resourceful in terms of improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

 

LESSON: Period 1à Have students watch the video Third World Canada www.thirdworldcanada.com. Students will complete the attached fill in the blank note file.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Period 2 à Students will write a newspaper article in which they interview a community member and outline the conditions found in some Indigenous communities. Students will submit newspaper article for assessment.

 

EXTENSION:

In order to promote good citizenship, what could you do about any of the situations that you have viewed? Outline a list of strategies that one could do to help improve the living conditions in some Indigenous communities?

 

SUGGESTED RESOURCES:

–          Third World Canada (2010) www.thirdworldcanada.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAC 200: Third World Canada Note File                             Name:___________________

 

 

 

            The film opened with the ___________ of parents who has left eight children behind in the community of __________. This community has a Child & Family Service Agency called __________ that is responsible for _____ communities in the North. These communities are riddled with poverty, __________, suicide, and economic hardship. There are not enough health care professionals trained to support families reeling from the loss of loved ones through __________.

 

            The film explores the reasons behind the loss of __________ many of these people from northern First Nations experience. First of all, it costs $23,000 for a __________ as there is only one plane and several people from neighbouring areas wanting to offer support to the deceased’s family. As well, many First Nations communities were forced to relocate to areas with no __________ base. In addition, houses that are built by the government are __________; little, usually just _____ room, with no __________ water, no __________, no __________, and improper __________. Most communities start with a low, overall budget. For example, one community receives $361,000. Out of this money, they build __________ houses and they actually need __________. Therefore, most families huddle together or children are sent to live with their __________ or ___________.

 

            There are many myths about the government helping First Nations peoples with __________ and __________, but the truth is that many First Nations communities have been neglected or ignored. The homes are __________, the water is ___________, the schools are__________, and the cost of food is __________. Canada has usually been rated as one of the top __________ countries to live in. However, most First Nations communities are ranked __________ in terms of __________ conditions. One older woman in the video received a cheque for $758.00 and her rent is $575.00/month. She cares for approximately _____ children, _____ of whom, are not her own. She cares for these extra children because their parents have committed __________. At the end of the month, after she pays __________, ___________, and __________, she has $50.00 left for food. She is similar to many First Nations peoples in terms of wanting to help keep children with First Nations communities rather than send them __________.

 

            In conclusion, this film uncovers __________ living conditions in many First Nations communities. Canadians need to be aware of what is happening in __________.

 

 

LESSON 3: Leadership in Indigenous Communities

LEARNING GOAL: Students will understand leadership and decision making structures in Indigenous communities.

TIMELINE: One 75-minute period

SUBJECT: NAC 20- Aboriginal People in Canada

CONNECTIONS TO OTHER SUBJECTS: GLS 10, CHV 20, GLC 20, ENG 1/2/3/4 L/A/P/E/C/U

LESSON OPENER:

Facilitator cue: Questions for consideration: What role does a leader play in establishing and sustaining a healthy community? How are decisions that affect communities made? Is it important that communities are governed by responsible and accountable representatives? Is it necessary to have citizens who are informed and active in their community?

 

SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY: Divide the class into small groups and ask them to brainstorm what qualities an effective leader possesses? Each group uses the chart attached to record leaders they know and their characteristics. Each group nominates a speaker to represent their ideas in a large group discussion. As the groups present their work, the teacher will create a mind-map on the board. Students should record the mind map in their notes at the same time.

 

Facilitator cue: Students may choose someone who is not necessarily considered a positive leader, for example, Hitler. Use this as a teaching moment to discuss characteristics of positive or effective leaders including respect, accountability, courage, generosity. True leadership is more than the ability to convince others to follow.

 

ASSESSMENT:

The leader fact sheet is to be submitted for evaluation.

 

EXTENSION:

Cooperative learning activity: Traditional talking circle. Students learn how leaders use a consensus building model to make decisions that are reflective of the needs and wants of their people. Students read Aboriginal Peoples In Canada, Reed et al, Pearson and GoodMinds, 2011, (pg.201) Building Your Skills. Students review the appendix item and participate in the activity on pg. 202. “Practice Your Skills.” Students write a two paragraph reflective response that explains what a talking circle is and describes their reaction to participating in this decision-making process. Guiding questions: Did you reach a decision? Did you participate fully? Did you feel that your voice was heard and your feelings were recognized? Would you use this model in the future? Why or why not?

 

SUGGESTED RESOURCES:

–          Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (Reed et al, Pearson and GoodMinds, 2011)

Who is a leader?

What makes him/her a leader?

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

   NAC 200: Indigenous Leadership                                     Name: ___________________

 

 

College of the rockies

FNST 205: Indigenizing Practice

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Flexible Assessment

 

Kieran McMonagle

C0058595

January 8, 2018
 

 

 

 

LESSON 1: Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resources

LEARNING GOAL: Students will become familiar with the varied relationships between Indigenous peoples and the natural resources found throughout Canada.

TIMELINE: One 75-minute period

SUBJECT: GCG 1D/P- Canadian Geography

CONNECTIONS TO OTHER SUBJECTS: CHC 2D/P, BTT 10, BTT 20

LESSON OPENER:

Facilitator will define primary, secondary, and tertiary sectors of the economy.

 

Facilitator cue:

 

Primary sector à operation or business that makes direct use of natural resources, usually through extraction and purification. Examples: oil, gas, fishing, forestry, agriculture, mining, etc.

 

Secondary sector à operation or business that produces manufactured or other processed goods. Examples: vehicles, clothing, processed foods, etc.

 

Tertiary sector à operation or business that produces services and may include transportation and distribution of goods. Examples: restaurant, retail stores, entertainment, etc. 

 

LESSON: Students will select a province and identify three Indigenous communities within the province. Using texts and internet resources, the student will then create a list of economic opportunities available to that community. Students will use the attached form for recording information. Students will then be grouped by province to share their findings with group members. Students can add additional information to build upon their form.  

 

ASSESSMENT:

One member from each provincial group will present their findings to the entire class. Students will add to their form throughout each province’s presentation.  All students should have a completed chart by the end of the class. Students are to submit their chart for evaluation.

 

SUGGESTED RESOURCES:

–          Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (Reed et al, Pearson and GoodMinds, 2011)

CGC 1D/P: Indigenous Peoples & Natural Resources     Name: ______________________

Province Name
 

Indigenous Community

Primary Sector

Secondary Sector

 
British Columbia
 

 

 

 

 
Alberta
 

 

 

 

 
Saskatchewan
 

 

 

 

 
Manitoba
 

 

 

 

 
Ontario
 

 

 

 

 
Quebec
 

 

 

 

 
New Brunswick
 

 

 

 

 
Nova Scotia
 

 

 

 

 
Prince Edward Island
 

 

 

 

 
Newfoundland
 

 

 

 

 
Nunavut
 

 

 

 

 
Northwest Territories
 

 

 

 

 
Yukon
 

 

 

 

LESSON 2: Third World Canada

LEARNING GOAL: Students will develop an awareness of living conditions in some Indigenous communities.

TIMELINE: Two 75-minute periods

SUBJECT: NAC 20- Aboriginal People in Canada

CONNECTIONS TO OTHER SUBJECTS: CHV 20, ENG 3U/C, HSE 3E, HSE 4M, HHS 4U/C, HSB 4U, NDA 3M, NDW 4M, NBE 3U/C

LESSON OPENER:

On the board, write the words “quality of life”. Ask students to consider what makes good quality of life? What are the characteristics of poor quality of life? Use a graphic organizer to organize these elements.

 

Facilitator cue: Explain that you will be watching the film Third World Canada; it is important to note that the film is blunt and explicit. The story is one that shows the Canadian government has not been very resourceful in terms of improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

 

LESSON: Period 1à Have students watch the video Third World Canada www.thirdworldcanada.com. Students will complete the attached fill in the blank note file.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Period 2 à Students will write a newspaper article in which they interview a community member and outline the conditions found in some Indigenous communities. Students will submit newspaper article for assessment.

 

EXTENSION:

In order to promote good citizenship, what could you do about any of the situations that you have viewed? Outline a list of strategies that one could do to help improve the living conditions in some Indigenous communities?

 

SUGGESTED RESOURCES:

–          Third World Canada (2010) www.thirdworldcanada.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAC 200: Third World Canada Note File                             Name:___________________

 

 

 

            The film opened with the ___________ of parents who has left eight children behind in the community of __________. This community has a Child & Family Service Agency called __________ that is responsible for _____ communities in the North. These communities are riddled with poverty, __________, suicide, and economic hardship. There are not enough health care professionals trained to support families reeling from the loss of loved ones through __________.

 

            The film explores the reasons behind the loss of __________ many of these people from northern First Nations experience. First of all, it costs $23,000 for a __________ as there is only one plane and several people from neighbouring areas wanting to offer support to the deceased’s family. As well, many First Nations communities were forced to relocate to areas with no __________ base. In addition, houses that are built by the government are __________; little, usually just _____ room, with no __________ water, no __________, no __________, and improper __________. Most communities start with a low, overall budget. For example, one community receives $361,000. Out of this money, they build __________ houses and they actually need __________. Therefore, most families huddle together or children are sent to live with their __________ or ___________.

 

            There are many myths about the government helping First Nations peoples with __________ and __________, but the truth is that many First Nations communities have been neglected or ignored. The homes are __________, the water is ___________, the schools are__________, and the cost of food is __________. Canada has usually been rated as one of the top __________ countries to live in. However, most First Nations communities are ranked __________ in terms of __________ conditions. One older woman in the video received a cheque for $758.00 and her rent is $575.00/month. She cares for approximately _____ children, _____ of whom, are not her own. She cares for these extra children because their parents have committed __________. At the end of the month, after she pays __________, ___________, and __________, she has $50.00 left for food. She is similar to many First Nations peoples in terms of wanting to help keep children with First Nations communities rather than send them __________.

 

            In conclusion, this film uncovers __________ living conditions in many First Nations communities. Canadians need to be aware of what is happening in __________.

 

 

LESSON 3: Leadership in Indigenous Communities

LEARNING GOAL: Students will understand leadership and decision making structures in Indigenous communities.

TIMELINE: One 75-minute period

SUBJECT: NAC 20- Aboriginal People in Canada

CONNECTIONS TO OTHER SUBJECTS: GLS 10, CHV 20, GLC 20, ENG 1/2/3/4 L/A/P/E/C/U

LESSON OPENER:

Facilitator cue: Questions for consideration: What role does a leader play in establishing and sustaining a healthy community? How are decisions that affect communities made? Is it important that communities are governed by responsible and accountable representatives? Is it necessary to have citizens who are informed and active in their community?

 

SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY: Divide the class into small groups and ask them to brainstorm what qualities an effective leader possesses? Each group uses the chart attached to record leaders they know and their characteristics. Each group nominates a speaker to represent their ideas in a large group discussion. As the groups present their work, the teacher will create a mind-map on the board. Students should record the mind map in their notes at the same time.

 

Facilitator cue: Students may choose someone who is not necessarily considered a positive leader, for example, Hitler. Use this as a teaching moment to discuss characteristics of positive or effective leaders including respect, accountability, courage, generosity. True leadership is more than the ability to convince others to follow.

 

ASSESSMENT:

The leader fact sheet is to be submitted for evaluation.

 

EXTENSION:

Cooperative learning activity: Traditional talking circle. Students learn how leaders use a consensus building model to make decisions that are reflective of the needs and wants of their people. Students read Aboriginal Peoples In Canada, Reed et al, Pearson and GoodMinds, 2011, (pg.201) Building Your Skills. Students review the appendix item and participate in the activity on pg. 202. “Practice Your Skills.” Students write a two paragraph reflective response that explains what a talking circle is and describes their reaction to participating in this decision-making process. Guiding questions: Did you reach a decision? Did you participate fully? Did you feel that your voice was heard and your feelings were recognized? Would you use this model in the future? Why or why not?

 

SUGGESTED RESOURCES:

–          Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (Reed et al, Pearson and GoodMinds, 2011)

Who is a leader?

What makes him/her a leader?

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

   NAC 200: Indigenous Leadership                                     Name: ___________________

 

 

x

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