A associates. Employees view sustainability performance as

A typical culture that builds on sustainability helps managers
and other decision makers deal with the tradeoffs
that the simultaneous management of social, environmental,
and financial goals often causes. At Nike, P&G,
The Home Depot, and Nissan North America, the corporate
culture emphasizes norms critical for innovation,
such as openness, autonomy, initiative, and, in many cases,
risk taking.
The Home Depot’s culture, for example, is all about
an entrepreneurial high-spiritedness and a willingness to
take risks, as well as a passionate commitment to customers,
colleagues, the company, and the community.
“Orange blood” runs through the veins of its associates.
Employees view sustainability performance as vital to The
Home Depot’s long-term financial success even though
incentives aren’t based on social and environmental performance.
Also, many Home Depot employees are environmentally
and socially conscious and have been the
driving force of some environmental initiatives, such as
the Framing Hope project, which donates to nonprofit
organizations damaged and outdated product that would
otherwise go to landfills. The company strengthens and
transmits its culture by maintaining transparency and
open lines of communication. It runs a weekly televised
show for store and department managers that discusses
issues of interest for company employees that may
include policies, products, programs, personnel, and the
like, and that provides an opportunity for better communication
throughout the company. The CEO can talk to
employees and get feedback from them. The Home Depot
also provides a mechanism for employee feedback
through the company’s intranet.
P&G, an innovation-driven and values-based company,
values everyone’s opinion, so there’s a good deal of discussion,
even at the lowest level. It does things from the
bottom up and by consensus, and it focuses on “the right
thing to do” even if sometimes that’s more expensive.
P;G took this motto from one of its core values—

A typical culture that builds on sustainability helps managers
and other decision makers deal with the tradeoffs
that the simultaneous management of social, environmental,
and financial goals often causes. At Nike, P&G,
The Home Depot, and Nissan North America, the corporate
culture emphasizes norms critical for innovation,
such as openness, autonomy, initiative, and, in many cases,
risk taking.
The Home Depot’s culture, for example, is all about
an entrepreneurial high-spiritedness and a willingness to
take risks, as well as a passionate commitment to customers,
colleagues, the company, and the community.
“Orange blood” runs through the veins of its associates.
Employees view sustainability performance as vital to The
Home Depot’s long-term financial success even though
incentives aren’t based on social and environmental performance.
Also, many Home Depot employees are environmentally
and socially conscious and have been the
driving force of some environmental initiatives, such as
the Framing Hope project, which donates to nonprofit
organizations damaged and outdated product that would
otherwise go to landfills. The company strengthens and
transmits its culture by maintaining transparency and
open lines of communication. It runs a weekly televised
show for store and department managers that discusses
issues of interest for company employees that may
include policies, products, programs, personnel, and the
like, and that provides an opportunity for better communication
throughout the company. The CEO can talk to
employees and get feedback from them. The Home Depot
also provides a mechanism for employee feedback
through the company’s intranet.
P&G, an innovation-driven and values-based company,
values everyone’s opinion, so there’s a good deal of discussion,
even at the lowest level. It does things from the
bottom up and by consensus, and it focuses on “the right
thing to do” even if sometimes that’s more expensive.
P;G took this motto from one of its core values—

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